Capybaras can stand and even walk a little on their hind legs. In this shot, Caplin Rous is standing tall so that he can rub his morrillo on a plant. The morrillo is a scent gland on the top of the nose.

Capybaras can stand and even walk a little on their hind legs. In this shot, Caplin Rous is standing tall so that he can rub his morrillo on a plant. The morrillo is a scent gland on the top of the nose.

Scratching Wesley at the Snake Farm earlier today. Notice his green chin. Capys are not the neatest eaters in the world.

Scratching Wesley at the Snake Farm earlier today. Notice his green chin. Capys are not the neatest eaters in the world.

Baby Caplin Rous trying to get to his milk bottle.

Baby Caplin Rous trying to get to his milk bottle.

There’s nothing cuter than a capybara nose like this one on Garibaldi Rous.

There’s nothing cuter than a capybara nose like this one on Garibaldi Rous.

Never mind me, I’m just another heron.

Never mind me, I’m just another heron.

Wesley, one of the capybaras at the Snake Farm in New Braunfels, is making real progress at learning to get on the scale. Unfortunately, I still can’t get an accurate weight like this.

Wesley, one of the capybaras at the Snake Farm in New Braunfels, is making real progress at learning to get on the scale. Unfortunately, I still can’t get an accurate weight like this.

This is the amazing Caplin Rous sleeping after a good graze in the back pasture. Apparently he got his foot through his harness, but it didn’t seem to bother him.

This is the amazing Caplin Rous sleeping after a good graze in the back pasture. Apparently he got his foot through his harness, but it didn’t seem to bother him.

Working with two capybaras at the same time is very difficult. In this photo you see me training Wesley to get up on the scale, which is still a work in progress, while Fiona wears her hoop on her neck. I use endive as their training treat because they absolutely love it and they only get it during training sessions.

Working with two capybaras at the same time is very difficult. In this photo you see me training Wesley to get up on the scale, which is still a work in progress, while Fiona wears her hoop on her neck. I use endive as their training treat because they absolutely love it and they only get it during training sessions.

Here comes Dobby!

Here comes Dobby!

I am teaching Fiona, one of the capybaras at the Snake Farm in New Braunfels, TX, to accept me putting a hoop over her head. This is the first step in training her to accept a harness. Having an animal that can be harnessed and walked on a leash is a great aid for a variety of reasons, among which are: moving from one enclosure to another, restraining for veterinary purposes, exercise, emergency evacuations. and recapture after any unexpected extra-enclosure activities.

I am teaching Fiona, one of the capybaras at the Snake Farm in New Braunfels, TX, to accept me putting a hoop over her head. This is the first step in training her to accept a harness. Having an animal that can be harnessed and walked on a leash is a great aid for a variety of reasons, among which are: moving from one enclosure to another, restraining for veterinary purposes, exercise, emergency evacuations. and recapture after any unexpected extra-enclosure activities.

I guess this male capybara in the Brazilian Pantanal is too big for those caiman to eat, but it makes me nervous.

I guess this male capybara in the Brazilian Pantanal is too big for those caiman to eat, but it makes me nervous.

A female capybara with four infants after emerging from a swim across a pond in the Brazilian Pantanal. The male was with them but not close enough to include in this shot. Typically, both male and female capybaras make excellent parents.

A female capybara with four infants after emerging from a swim across a pond in the Brazilian Pantanal. The male was with them but not close enough to include in this shot. Typically, both male and female capybaras make excellent parents.

Dobby Winnick is looking for his morning milk.

Dobby Winnick is looking for his morning milk.

Father and baby capybara in the wilds of the Brazilian Pantanal. Notice that the adult male has a serious, though apparently old, injury to his face that exposes his entire incisors and causes his mouth to hang open. Baby says, “He ain’t ugly, he’s my papa!”

Father and baby capybara in the wilds of the Brazilian Pantanal. Notice that the adult male has a serious, though apparently old, injury to his face that exposes his entire incisors and causes his mouth to hang open. Baby says, “He ain’t ugly, he’s my papa!”

A young wild capybara walks along a river bank in the Brazilian Pantanal.

A young wild capybara walks along a river bank in the Brazilian Pantanal.